Standards Based Development

Standards Based Development

nes Color Palette
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NES Color Palette via Erik Red @ DeviantArt

NES Color Palette With Instructions

The system has an available color palette of 48 colors and 6 grays. Red, green and blue can be individually darkened at specific screen regions using carefully timed code. Up to 25 simultaneous colors may be used without writing new values mid-frame: a background color, four sets of three tile colors and four sets of three sprite colors. This total does not include color de-emphasis.[60] The NES palette is based on NTSC rather than RGB values. Normally, every group of four tiles (in a 2x2 square) must share the same colors, but one mode of the MMC5 relaxed this to one palette per tile.
A total of 64 sprites may be displayed onscreen at a given time without reloading sprites mid-screen. Sprites are 8 pixels wide and may be 8 or 16 pixels tall, although the choice must be made globally, as it affects all sprites (Contra and Super Mario Bros. 3 for example use 8x16 mode). Up to eight sprites may be present on one scanline, using a flag to indicate when additional sprites are to be dropped. This flag allows the software to rotate sprite priorities, increasing maximum amount of sprites, but typically causing flicker.[60] Because of the small size of NES sprites, games use multiple ones for larger moving objects.
The PPU allows only one scrolling layer, though the horizontal scroll can be changed on a per-scan line basis for a parallax effect. The vertical scroll can also be changed between scanlines for a split-screen effect.[60] On many games, this is done by trapping Sprite 0 and the NMI (which triggers during the vertical retrace), but the more advanced memory mappers (see below) generate an interrupt which can be used for this purpose.
The standard display resolution of the NES is 256 horizontal pixels by 240 vertical pixels. Typically, games designed for NTSC-based systems had an effective resolution of only 256 by 224 pixels, as the top and bottom 8 scanlines are not visible on most television sets. For additional video memory bandwidth, it was possible to turn off rendering before the raster reached the very bottom or after it had restarted at the top.[60]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_Entertainment_System#Video

rgb(124, 124 ,124)

rgb(0, 0 ,252)

rgb(0, 0 ,188)

rgb(68, 40 ,188)

rgb(148, 0 ,132)

rgb(168, 0 ,32)

rgb(168, 16 ,0)

rgb(136, 20 ,0)

rgb(80, 48 ,0)

rgb(0, 120 ,0)

rgb(0, 104 ,0)

rgb(0, 88 ,0)

rgb(0, 64 ,88)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)

rgb(188, 188 ,188)

rgb(0, 120 ,248)

rgb(0, 88 ,248)

rgb(104, 68 ,252)

rgb(216, 0 ,204)

rgb(228, 0 ,88)

rgb(248, 56 ,0)

rgb(228, 92 ,16)

rgb(172, 124 ,0)

rgb(0, 184 ,0)

rgb(0, 168 ,0)

rgb(0, 168 ,68)

rgb(0, 136 ,136)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)

rgb(248, 248 ,248)

rgb(60, 188 ,252)

rgb(104, 136 ,252)

rgb(152, 120 ,248)

rgb(248, 120 ,248)

rgb(248, 88 ,152)

rgb(248, 120 ,88)

rgb(252, 160 ,68)

rgb(248, 184 ,0)

rgb(184, 24 ,)

rgb(88, 216 ,84)

rgb(88, 248 ,152)

rgb(0, 232 ,216)

rgb(120, 120 ,120)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)

rgb(252, 252 ,252)

rgb(164, 228 ,252)

rgb(184, 184 ,248)

rgb(216, 184 ,248)

rgb(248, 184 ,248)

rgb(248, 164 ,192)

rgb(240, 208 ,176)

rgb(252, 224 ,168)

rgb(248, 216 ,120)

rgb(216, 248 ,120)

rgb(184, 248 ,184)

rgb(184, 248 ,216)

rgb(0, 252 ,252)

rgb(216, 216 ,216)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)

rgb(0, 0 ,0)